TRAGUE

Ritger // 20 // architectual design student // dutch

TRAGUE
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cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

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cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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jeroenapers:

Een van de betere underground nachtclubs kan je vinden in Beiroet, letterlijk ondergronds. Deze voormalige quarantaine buiten de stad lijkt een desolaat stuk stad, maar als je bij BO18 naar beneden gaat, kom je in een briljante club, in 1998 ontworpen door Bernard Khoury Architects. Elke nacht gaat het dak er af, ook dat weer letterlijk.
jeroenapers:

Een van de betere underground nachtclubs kan je vinden in Beiroet, letterlijk ondergronds. Deze voormalige quarantaine buiten de stad lijkt een desolaat stuk stad, maar als je bij BO18 naar beneden gaat, kom je in een briljante club, in 1998 ontworpen door Bernard Khoury Architects. Elke nacht gaat het dak er af, ook dat weer letterlijk.
jeroenapers:

Een van de betere underground nachtclubs kan je vinden in Beiroet, letterlijk ondergronds. Deze voormalige quarantaine buiten de stad lijkt een desolaat stuk stad, maar als je bij BO18 naar beneden gaat, kom je in een briljante club, in 1998 ontworpen door Bernard Khoury Architects. Elke nacht gaat het dak er af, ook dat weer letterlijk.
jeroenapers:

Een van de betere underground nachtclubs kan je vinden in Beiroet, letterlijk ondergronds. Deze voormalige quarantaine buiten de stad lijkt een desolaat stuk stad, maar als je bij BO18 naar beneden gaat, kom je in een briljante club, in 1998 ontworpen door Bernard Khoury Architects. Elke nacht gaat het dak er af, ook dat weer letterlijk.
jeroenapers:

Een van de betere underground nachtclubs kan je vinden in Beiroet, letterlijk ondergronds. Deze voormalige quarantaine buiten de stad lijkt een desolaat stuk stad, maar als je bij BO18 naar beneden gaat, kom je in een briljante club, in 1998 ontworpen door Bernard Khoury Architects. Elke nacht gaat het dak er af, ook dat weer letterlijk.
jeroenapers:

Een van de betere underground nachtclubs kan je vinden in Beiroet, letterlijk ondergronds. Deze voormalige quarantaine buiten de stad lijkt een desolaat stuk stad, maar als je bij BO18 naar beneden gaat, kom je in een briljante club, in 1998 ontworpen door Bernard Khoury Architects. Elke nacht gaat het dak er af, ook dat weer letterlijk.
jeroenapers:

Een van de betere underground nachtclubs kan je vinden in Beiroet, letterlijk ondergronds. Deze voormalige quarantaine buiten de stad lijkt een desolaat stuk stad, maar als je bij BO18 naar beneden gaat, kom je in een briljante club, in 1998 ontworpen door Bernard Khoury Architects. Elke nacht gaat het dak er af, ook dat weer letterlijk.
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hideback:

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867-1959)
Pacific Dwelling for Mr. and Mrs. Morris, San Francisco, 1945
VC Morris commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build a gallery on Maiden Lane in San Francisco. While working together, Wright proposed this mansion for Morris’ dramatic lot in San Francisco’s Seacliff neighborhood. Morris considered Wright’s first design too elaborate (top). He asked Wright to dial it back. The bottom image shows the toned-down version haha. It was never built; Morris’ Xanadu Gallery is Wright’s only San Francisco building.
hideback:

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867-1959)
Pacific Dwelling for Mr. and Mrs. Morris, San Francisco, 1945
VC Morris commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build a gallery on Maiden Lane in San Francisco. While working together, Wright proposed this mansion for Morris’ dramatic lot in San Francisco’s Seacliff neighborhood. Morris considered Wright’s first design too elaborate (top). He asked Wright to dial it back. The bottom image shows the toned-down version haha. It was never built; Morris’ Xanadu Gallery is Wright’s only San Francisco building.
hideback:

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867-1959)
Pacific Dwelling for Mr. and Mrs. Morris, San Francisco, 1945
VC Morris commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build a gallery on Maiden Lane in San Francisco. While working together, Wright proposed this mansion for Morris’ dramatic lot in San Francisco’s Seacliff neighborhood. Morris considered Wright’s first design too elaborate (top). He asked Wright to dial it back. The bottom image shows the toned-down version haha. It was never built; Morris’ Xanadu Gallery is Wright’s only San Francisco building.
hideback:

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867-1959)
Pacific Dwelling for Mr. and Mrs. Morris, San Francisco, 1945
VC Morris commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright to build a gallery on Maiden Lane in San Francisco. While working together, Wright proposed this mansion for Morris’ dramatic lot in San Francisco’s Seacliff neighborhood. Morris considered Wright’s first design too elaborate (top). He asked Wright to dial it back. The bottom image shows the toned-down version haha. It was never built; Morris’ Xanadu Gallery is Wright’s only San Francisco building.
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cjwho:

FOO Residence, Yokohama City, Japan by APOLLO Architects & Associates | via
The site is located in a residential area on a plateau in Yokohama-city. The characteristic façade is designed with exposed concrete and wooden lattices of Serangan batu wood, taking the horizon into consideration. It is a classic of modern design that is conscious of harmony with the surrounding greens and peaceful townscape. This two-family house successfully creates a dignity and formality that are unique to the residence.
The husband who likes playing golf and the wife who loves gardening desired a garden, which can be seen from the central living room on the first floor, as the center of the house. They also desired a continuation between East and West, and assurance of privacy. The solid teak wood on the ceilings and floors, and the hard expression of the high-strength concrete create a contrast. They provide a sense of unity to the space, along with the natural walnut house fixtures, oak table and chairs. The space for family of the son, who likes surfing, is placed on the second floor that is connected through the open ceiling, in order to facilitate spontaneous communication between the families. In contrast to the closed exterior appearance, the interior is all airy. Even the dining kitchen at the back of the first floor is well lit by characteristic lights from the high side window in the open ceiling.
The roof balcony is accessible from the second floor bedroom and the children’s room through the opening. The roof terrace with deck-flooring behind the outdoor stairs is a common oasis for the two families, where the surrounding town can be viewed. By tactfully using the wooden lattices and plantings, a perfect sense of distance and privacy are created between the building and the street, while enabling the enjoyment of the appropriate openness. It functions as a well-balanced urban house.
Photography: Masao Nishikawa
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

FOO Residence, Yokohama City, Japan by APOLLO Architects & Associates | via
The site is located in a residential area on a plateau in Yokohama-city. The characteristic façade is designed with exposed concrete and wooden lattices of Serangan batu wood, taking the horizon into consideration. It is a classic of modern design that is conscious of harmony with the surrounding greens and peaceful townscape. This two-family house successfully creates a dignity and formality that are unique to the residence.
The husband who likes playing golf and the wife who loves gardening desired a garden, which can be seen from the central living room on the first floor, as the center of the house. They also desired a continuation between East and West, and assurance of privacy. The solid teak wood on the ceilings and floors, and the hard expression of the high-strength concrete create a contrast. They provide a sense of unity to the space, along with the natural walnut house fixtures, oak table and chairs. The space for family of the son, who likes surfing, is placed on the second floor that is connected through the open ceiling, in order to facilitate spontaneous communication between the families. In contrast to the closed exterior appearance, the interior is all airy. Even the dining kitchen at the back of the first floor is well lit by characteristic lights from the high side window in the open ceiling.
The roof balcony is accessible from the second floor bedroom and the children’s room through the opening. The roof terrace with deck-flooring behind the outdoor stairs is a common oasis for the two families, where the surrounding town can be viewed. By tactfully using the wooden lattices and plantings, a perfect sense of distance and privacy are created between the building and the street, while enabling the enjoyment of the appropriate openness. It functions as a well-balanced urban house.
Photography: Masao Nishikawa
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

FOO Residence, Yokohama City, Japan by APOLLO Architects & Associates | via
The site is located in a residential area on a plateau in Yokohama-city. The characteristic façade is designed with exposed concrete and wooden lattices of Serangan batu wood, taking the horizon into consideration. It is a classic of modern design that is conscious of harmony with the surrounding greens and peaceful townscape. This two-family house successfully creates a dignity and formality that are unique to the residence.
The husband who likes playing golf and the wife who loves gardening desired a garden, which can be seen from the central living room on the first floor, as the center of the house. They also desired a continuation between East and West, and assurance of privacy. The solid teak wood on the ceilings and floors, and the hard expression of the high-strength concrete create a contrast. They provide a sense of unity to the space, along with the natural walnut house fixtures, oak table and chairs. The space for family of the son, who likes surfing, is placed on the second floor that is connected through the open ceiling, in order to facilitate spontaneous communication between the families. In contrast to the closed exterior appearance, the interior is all airy. Even the dining kitchen at the back of the first floor is well lit by characteristic lights from the high side window in the open ceiling.
The roof balcony is accessible from the second floor bedroom and the children’s room through the opening. The roof terrace with deck-flooring behind the outdoor stairs is a common oasis for the two families, where the surrounding town can be viewed. By tactfully using the wooden lattices and plantings, a perfect sense of distance and privacy are created between the building and the street, while enabling the enjoyment of the appropriate openness. It functions as a well-balanced urban house.
Photography: Masao Nishikawa
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

FOO Residence, Yokohama City, Japan by APOLLO Architects & Associates | via
The site is located in a residential area on a plateau in Yokohama-city. The characteristic façade is designed with exposed concrete and wooden lattices of Serangan batu wood, taking the horizon into consideration. It is a classic of modern design that is conscious of harmony with the surrounding greens and peaceful townscape. This two-family house successfully creates a dignity and formality that are unique to the residence.
The husband who likes playing golf and the wife who loves gardening desired a garden, which can be seen from the central living room on the first floor, as the center of the house. They also desired a continuation between East and West, and assurance of privacy. The solid teak wood on the ceilings and floors, and the hard expression of the high-strength concrete create a contrast. They provide a sense of unity to the space, along with the natural walnut house fixtures, oak table and chairs. The space for family of the son, who likes surfing, is placed on the second floor that is connected through the open ceiling, in order to facilitate spontaneous communication between the families. In contrast to the closed exterior appearance, the interior is all airy. Even the dining kitchen at the back of the first floor is well lit by characteristic lights from the high side window in the open ceiling.
The roof balcony is accessible from the second floor bedroom and the children’s room through the opening. The roof terrace with deck-flooring behind the outdoor stairs is a common oasis for the two families, where the surrounding town can be viewed. By tactfully using the wooden lattices and plantings, a perfect sense of distance and privacy are created between the building and the street, while enabling the enjoyment of the appropriate openness. It functions as a well-balanced urban house.
Photography: Masao Nishikawa
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

FOO Residence, Yokohama City, Japan by APOLLO Architects & Associates | via
The site is located in a residential area on a plateau in Yokohama-city. The characteristic façade is designed with exposed concrete and wooden lattices of Serangan batu wood, taking the horizon into consideration. It is a classic of modern design that is conscious of harmony with the surrounding greens and peaceful townscape. This two-family house successfully creates a dignity and formality that are unique to the residence.
The husband who likes playing golf and the wife who loves gardening desired a garden, which can be seen from the central living room on the first floor, as the center of the house. They also desired a continuation between East and West, and assurance of privacy. The solid teak wood on the ceilings and floors, and the hard expression of the high-strength concrete create a contrast. They provide a sense of unity to the space, along with the natural walnut house fixtures, oak table and chairs. The space for family of the son, who likes surfing, is placed on the second floor that is connected through the open ceiling, in order to facilitate spontaneous communication between the families. In contrast to the closed exterior appearance, the interior is all airy. Even the dining kitchen at the back of the first floor is well lit by characteristic lights from the high side window in the open ceiling.
The roof balcony is accessible from the second floor bedroom and the children’s room through the opening. The roof terrace with deck-flooring behind the outdoor stairs is a common oasis for the two families, where the surrounding town can be viewed. By tactfully using the wooden lattices and plantings, a perfect sense of distance and privacy are created between the building and the street, while enabling the enjoyment of the appropriate openness. It functions as a well-balanced urban house.
Photography: Masao Nishikawa
CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
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katabolizm:

S.M.A.O. - Chapel, Almadén 2001. Photos (C) Roland Halbe, Hisao Suzuki.
katabolizm:

S.M.A.O. - Chapel, Almadén 2001. Photos (C) Roland Halbe, Hisao Suzuki.
katabolizm:

S.M.A.O. - Chapel, Almadén 2001. Photos (C) Roland Halbe, Hisao Suzuki.
katabolizm:

S.M.A.O. - Chapel, Almadén 2001. Photos (C) Roland Halbe, Hisao Suzuki.
katabolizm:

S.M.A.O. - Chapel, Almadén 2001. Photos (C) Roland Halbe, Hisao Suzuki.
katabolizm:

S.M.A.O. - Chapel, Almadén 2001. Photos (C) Roland Halbe, Hisao Suzuki.
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rollership:

Alexandre Dumas’ Cottage, Marly le Roi, France
photo via jael
oh, moats are an alarm
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