TRAGUE

Ritger // 20 // architectual design student // dutch

TRAGUE
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beesandbombs:

twisting cubes
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cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

L’Écran House, Canada by Alain Carle | via
Located beside a lake in the Wentworth-Nord municipality, the weekend house was designed by Alain Carle with a sprawling plan, dictated by both the awkward shape of the site and the surrounding views.
"The buildable area was somewhat narrow and irregular, which offered the opportunity to design a project outside the typical precepts of ‘stylish’ residences," explained Carle.
The architect created a series of walls that screen views of the nearby street and instead direct focus towards the nearby lake. This prompted the name of the residence, L’Écran, which translates as The Screen.
"The geometrical complexity was scrupulously validated," said Carle.
"This essentially involved blocking the relationship with the street while enhancing the view of the lake, both from inside the residence and from the street, by leaving sight lines to past places marking the trails taken by the log drivers along the lake."
The house has two storeys, both of which meet the ground at some point around the exterior. The upper floor is the main level, accommodating the majority of living areas and the master bedroom, while the lower level houses four extra bedrooms and a home cinema.
Recycled bricks were used to infill the walls of the timber and steel structure. Black paint coats all of these surfaces, matching the black window frames and giving a sense of uniformity to the exterior.
Photography: Adrien Williams
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
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derek-fernandes:

Lucas, 2014
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subtilitas:

Christian Pottgiesser - Galvani House, Paris 2003. Via, photos (C) Gert von Bassewitz.
subtilitas:

Christian Pottgiesser - Galvani House, Paris 2003. Via, photos (C) Gert von Bassewitz.
subtilitas:

Christian Pottgiesser - Galvani House, Paris 2003. Via, photos (C) Gert von Bassewitz.
subtilitas:

Christian Pottgiesser - Galvani House, Paris 2003. Via, photos (C) Gert von Bassewitz.
subtilitas:

Christian Pottgiesser - Galvani House, Paris 2003. Via, photos (C) Gert von Bassewitz.
subtilitas:

Christian Pottgiesser - Galvani House, Paris 2003. Via, photos (C) Gert von Bassewitz.
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visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
visualgraphc:

Principles of Design in Paper Art by Efil Turk
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suydamandgomorrah:

Oji: New Year’s Eve Foxfires at the Changing Tree
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cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
cjwho:

Tula House, Canada by Patkau Architects | via
This Canadian house by Patkau Architects is anchored to a rock by steel rods so that it treads lightly on the ground and cantilevers above the Pacific Ocean.
Tula House by Vancouver-based Patkau Architects was designed as the main home for a married couple on Quadra Island, nearly six hours’ drive north of Vancouver. It also doubles as informal headquarters for their organisation, Tula Foundation, which supports healthcare and environmental initiatives.
The remote cliff-top house rests 13 metres above the water, and is surrounded by spectacular and varied scenery. There is a forest behind, and the Strait of Georgia in front, where the owners can also see the mountains of British Columbia in the distance.
"The topography of the site is highly irregular, and the prospects are diverse," said architect John Patkau. "One site is actually many sites."
The house replaces a dilapidated cottage and attempts to realign the site with its surroundings, according to architects, whose other projects include a cluster of temporary shelters for ice-skaters and designs for six earth-sheltered houses on land surrounding Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater house.
Land that had been extensively filled in was removed to reveal the site’s natural terrain, and native vegetation that had been stripped away was re-planted. The house is designed as a single-storey building to provide a more direct and intimate connection with the landscape, and features a moss-covered roof to help it blend in with moss-covered basalt hills nearby.
Photography: James Dow, Patkau Architects
CJWHO: facebook | instagram | twitter | pinterest | subscribe
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cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe
cjwho:

Loft in Brooklyn by Alina Preciado by Dan Gitane

This industrial-eclectic loft is the home of designer and artist Alina Preciado and her two cats, situated in a 1800s industrial building in the Fort Greene neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York. The 2,000 square foot loft with one bedroom and one bathroom mixes old and new pieces together, with findings that Preciado has picked up from her travels to places like Japan, Spain, India and the Middle East. The designer imports handmade goods for her business, Dan Gitane. “Dar” is Arabic for “home” and “gitane” is French for “gypsy”, which sums up Preciado’s personality. The loft was originally a woodshop, which has divots and scratches on the flooring, which has been preserved for its history.

The loft features an incredible flow with an open and airy floor plan, huge windows and high ceilings that keeps the space well lit. The home also has a hammock which Preciado spends a lot of time on, as well as a trapeze bar, perfect for stretching. The living room was a vintage leather sofa from the 1960s, the leaning ladder was obtained from a warehouse. The living area also has a large wood-burning stove with a double-insulated chimney, which is in keeping with the industrial theme as well as providing plenty of warmth in the winter months. A neat tip that Preiado does with her stove is place citrus peels on top and left the smell permeate through the home.

Photography: Chris A. Dorsey

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